Tag Archives: Salem

Fantastic Metal Beasts and Where to Find Them in Salem

Looking for something free and extremely out of the ordinary to do in Salem, Massachusetts?  How about a visit to a yard full of metal sculptures? Yes, you read that correctly.  If you’re visiting Salem or live nearby, you should stop by this outdoor sculpture gallery located in, yes, someone’s front yard.

The remarkable sculptures range from recognizable to, well, rather abstract.  Each of the peculiar pieces of art is made from recycled and reused metal materials that the owner-artist has salvaged or saved.  From giant insects to robots riding rolling machines to mechanized fountains, you can’t help but smile when admiring the rather unique display.  There’s even a large collection of antique and whimsical door knockers assembled on the yard’s fence. Both adults and children will surely be amused by this curious collection.

If someone is home, they’re happy to let you wander around the yard to get a close up look.  If not, you can easily see everything from outside the fence, as we did.

Things to Know

The home is adjacent to a parking lot for the Salem Ferry, but the parking is not free.  You may be able to find a space on the adjacent main road. Otherwise, pull the car over, put on your hazard lights, and enjoy for a few minutes. 

Location

The yard of metal sculptures is located at 10 Blaney St. in Salem, Massachusetts. Click on the link for directions.

Follow the signs for the Salem Ferry 

The Rebecca Nurse Homestead: Historic House of a Falsely Accused Salem Witch

The Rebecca Nurse Homestead is one of the best places to learn about the Salem Witch Trials, but what might surprise you is that it’s not located in Salem, Massachusetts.  Today, the Rebecca Nurse Homestead is located in the town of Danvers. At the time of the trials, Danvers was known as Salem Village and was the epicenter of the beginnings of the witch hysteria.  In addition, the Rebecca Nurse Homestead is the only home of a person convicted in the Salem Witch Trials that’s open to the public. If that’s not enough of a reason to visit, let me tell you a bit of Rebecca’s story which is sure to make you want to.

Despite the fact she was 71 years old and that she was a well-respected and extremely pious member of the community, Rebecca Nurse was convicted and executed for witchcraft in 1692.  After a warrant was issued for her arrest on March 24, a petition signed by 39 members of the public (which is a lot of people in a small village) was presented to the court in support of Rebecca.  Nevertheless, her trial began in June. The accusations levelled against Rebecca were based on so-called “spectral evidence” which involved a witch sending her spirit to torment and torture others. Many prominent people in Salem town (modern Salem) and Salem Village (modern Danvers) testified in her defense.  However, when the young girls, who were paraded in front of the court in every trial, entered the courtroom and saw Rebecca, they broke out into fits and claimed that she had afflicted them right then and there. Not convinced by the evidence, the jury found Rebecca to be innocent. However, those who were supposedly plagued by Rebecca’s spirit continued to be afflicted, and the judges and jury were called back to review her case.  After additional deliberations, which were surprisingly legal at the time, the jury found her guilty of witchcraft on June 30, and she was sentenced to death. On July 19, Rebecca, along with four other women, were hung until dead at Proctor’s Ledge.  

My friend, her two children, and I visited the Rebecca Nurse Homestead on the anniversary of her death.  The homestead consists of the original house, several outbuildings, and 25 acres (of the original 300 acre farm) of land.  You’ll begin your guided tour in a reproduction of the Salem Village Meeting House where many of the initial hearings of the Salem Witch Trials were held.  The recreation was originally constructed in 1984 for the film “Three Sovereigns for Sarah”, which I highly recommend if you are interested in the Salem Witch Trials.  

Being a historian and educator, I’m not easily impressed by tour guides, but the female staff member of the Rebecca Nurse Homestead was both extremely knowledgeable and exceptionally passionate about Rebecca’s past and the history of the witch hysteria.  In the meeting house reproduction, she began the tour by giving us a very detailed history of the witch trials and a look into the minds of the accused, the accusers, and the people of that community. Although her explanation may have been too comprehensive and lengthy for some, my friend and I were engulfed by the story.  Following the recounting of the trial and execution, we were led into the Nurse home. The tour included four of the oldest rooms of the house. Our guide explained the history of the home, the everyday jobs and lives of the various family members who lived there during colonial and revolutionary times, and the uses of many of the historical reproductions that have been placed in the house to make it come alive for visitors.  My friend’s children, later, stated that the tour of the Nurse home was their favorite part of the tour because they enjoyed seeing where and how people lived in the past.

The grounds of the Rebecca Nurse Homestead also contain a gift shop, located in an old barn, and the family graveyard.  There, you’ll find a number of graves, the Victorian Era monument placed where Rebecca is supposedly buried (see below), and another monument dedicated to George Jacobs.  During the Salem Witch Trials, Jacobs was executed for witchcraft in 1692, but his bones were only discovered, in a drawer of the Danvers Historical Society, in the 1970’s, tested and believed to be authentically his.  Based upon those results, he was reinterred on the Nurse Homestead (since he once lived nearby) during the 300th anniversary of the trials in 1992. The Nurse Graveyard remains the only truly known burial site of someone convicted during the Salem Witch Trials.

In fact, no one actually knows what happened to the bodies of the accused witches.  According to the law and to Christian beliefs of the time, the convicted could not be given a proper burial because they were executed for witchcraft.  Most likely, family members secretly took the bodies away to be buried at undisclosed locations. For example, it is believed that Rebecca’s husband and son whisked her body away from Proctor’s Ledge and buried it in the family graveyard.  Today, a memorial, that was built in 1885, stands at the place where she was supposedly buried.

All of this brings to mind the question: Why was Rebecca convicted of witchcraft after having been deemed innocent? Well, you’ll have to visit the homestead, hear her entire story, ask questions, and find out for yourself.  

Location

The Rebecca Nurse Homestead is located at 149 Pine St. in Danvers, MA. Click on the name for driving directions.

If you plan on visiting, be sure to check their website for their hours since they depend on the season and the day.

The Punto Urban Art Museum: An Unconventional Art Gallery in Salem

The Punto Urban Art Museum is an outdoor gallery of colorful murals painted onto the sides of buildings and walls in the Point Neighborhood of Salem, Massachusetts.  We tremendously enjoyed walking around and checking out the vibrant, visually-stimulating, and thought-provoking pieces of art spread over just a few city blocks. Walking along the waterfront and in between various buildings in order to find each of the murals was like an artistic scavenger hunt that even kids would enjoy.  There’s also an app that you can download that provides a handy map of the murals, basic details about each piece, and links to other works by each artist. Just type “Punto Urban Art Museum” into the App Store or Google Play Store.

While one may appreciate the pieces for simply the creative expressions that they are, the outdoor museum is so much more.  Created as a social justice art program, the Punto Urban Art Museum preserves, retells, and displays, the ancestral and immigration stories of over a century of immigration in Salem.   Artists, community members, educators, and non-profit organizations have collaborated to produce the visual storytelling of the various cultures and communities that have called the Point Neighborhood home.  The organizations and individuals that have helped to fund and support the program hope that the artwork will bring new visitors into the neighborhood and will instill a sense of pride of community in its residents, especially the children growing up there. 

Whether you’re a lover of art, an urban explorer, or just a person, like me, who appreciates something out of the ordinary, you will tremendously enjoy a visit to the Punto Urban Art Museum.  Come to see the imaginative and playful artwork and, at the same time, support an incredible community project. 

The Punto Urban Art Museum is located at 91-1 Peabody St. in Salem.  Be aware that Peabody Street is a one way, so you’ll have to go up Ward St. and then turn onto Peabody St.  Click on the link for directions.

Witch City Eats: My Top Places to Nosh in Salem, Massachusetts

Salem, Massachusetts may be a small city, but the variety of restaurants is impressive.  Here are my favorites, listed in order of greatness, in the Witch City.  Don’t visit Salem without eating at, at least, the first two.

1. Caramel

I’m starting with dessert for a very good reason . . . I can honestly tell you that I haven’t enjoyed French pastries this good outside of Paris.  As soon as you enter, your eye will be drawn to the long, glass counter filled with meticulously made pastries of every shape and color.  Just admiring them is a feast for the senses.  I always take several minutes to decide what I want because there are too many good choices.  I’ve also been known to order two desserts just for myself!  Before making your selection, be sure to wander over to the case of scrumptious macarons in a variety of flavors.  The master chef at Caramel comes from South Central France, and the techniques that he uses to magically create the pastries have been passed down to him from his great grandfather who opened a patisserie in France back in 1931. If you love French pastries as much as I do, then run (don’t walk) to Caramel.  If you visit Salem without stopping there, you are seriously missing out!  

2. Boston Burger Company

Do you love a juicy, delicious, big-as-your-head burger as much as I do?  If so, there’s no better place in Massachusetts to get one than at Boston Burger Company!  Mind you, these are not your everyday burgers.  From the “Killer Bee”, with a stack of beer-battered onion rings, honey, BBQ sauce, and American cheese, to the “Whiskey Tango Foxtrot”, piled high with mac and cheese, pulled pork, onion rings and BBQ sauce, to “The King”, featuring peanut butter, bacon, and fried bananas, to the “Sophie” topped with prosciutto, goat cheese, candied walnuts, fig jam, greens, and a balsamic reduction, the large menu has something for everyone in your group.  Boston Burger also offers a variety of lip-smacking frappes (milkshakes) and a plethora of options to crank up the flavor on their hand-cut fries.  Why eat regular fries when you can have them covered with bruschetta, garlic parm, Greek or nacho toppings, caramel and cinnamon, or even clam chowda’?  Boston Burger Company also offers appetizers, salads, boneless wings, and sandwiches, but I always stick to their namesake.  The restaurant is very popular, but if you have to wait too long for a table, don’t skip eating there.  Just call in an order for take out and then find a bench or a nice piece of grass to settle in.   Boston Burger is so good that you should resort to all options to eat there!

3. The Clam Shack

If you love classic New England fried seafood, then the Clam Shack is the place for you.  Located in the grounds of Salem Willows and overlooking the ocean, eating at the Clam Shack is a no-frills (think outside picnic tables) experience for your taste buds.  Please do not let the outdoor seating put you off, the seafood here is the best!  The menu ranges from perennial favorites like whole belly clams or clam strips to flaky haddock to (my favorite) fried calamari.  Can’t make a decision?  Then order the Captain’s Combo.  The Clam Shack lets you decide how hungry you are, or in my case, how hungry I think I am!  Choose from a roll, a box, a basket, or a full dinner plate portion.  They even have non-seafood options for you landlubbers. The best thing about the eating there (other than the food, of course) is that you can combine your meal with an enjoyable afternoon or evening at Salem Willows.

4. Flatbread Company

Seafood not your thing?  Do you have people in your group with special diets or food allergies?  Don’t worry because I’ve got you covered!  Flatbread Company serves pizza (and more) made from organic ingredients, that are sourced from local farmers, cooked to perfection in a natural, wood-fired clay oven.  They’re happy to make substitutions in any of their meals and have menu items that cater specifically to vegetarian, vegan, and gluten free diets.  Try “Mopsy’s Kalua Pork Pie”, with smoked pork shoulder, free range chicken, mango BBQ sauce, pineapple, whole milk mozzarella, parmesan, garlic oil and their own herb mixture.  If your mouth isn’t watering yet, imagine digging into the “Punctuated Equilibrium” featuring a ton of veggies and imported Kalamata olives or the “Jimmy’s Free-Range Chicken” with black beans, cilantro tomatoes, roasted corn, mozzarella and parmesan, jalapenos, and a sour cream lime drizzle.  It makes me want to phone in an order right now!  You can also design your own pizza from a wide variety of organic toppings, and Flatbread even has gluten free crusts, that my friend attests are the best she’s ever had.  If all of this wasn’t enough, you can enjoy waterside, outdoor seating, and . . . get ready for it . . . connected to the restaurant is a small candlepin bowling alley.  How fun!  Make a day, an afternoon, or even a date night out of it.  Flatbread Company is my number one choice for pizza in the Witch City, if not in the entire North Shore of Massachusetts!

5. Passage to India

Looking for something more exotic and full of Asian flavors and spices? Passage to India will take you on an amazing food journey from the northern to the southern parts of the Indian Subcontinent without ever having to leave your seat.  Every meal is served fresh and features spices that are ground in-house.  I recommend starting with the vegetable pakoras, the meat samosas, or the delicious coconut soup.   For a main course, I recommend the flavorful Chicken Mango or the creamy Lamb Korma.  If you’ve never tried a dosa before, I highly encourage you to order one.  Picture a thin and very long crepe, made of ground lentils and rice, stuffed with meat and/or vegetables of your choice, and served with sweet coconut chutney.  I dare you to try finishing it in one sitting!  I may have once or twice J.  Passage to India also offers a plethora of vegetarian options, and don’t forget to partake in some made-to-order naan bread with your meal.  Go for the Kashmire Naan that’s loaded with raisins, cashews, and coconut.  I think it’s more like dessert than a side course, but that’s an even better reason to enjoy it!

6. Turner’s Seafood

For slightly more upscale seafood dining, my “go to” place is Turner’s Seafood.  Turner’s began as a wholesale fish company in 1954, and one of their fresh fish markets continue to exist today right inside the restaurant located in the old Lyceum Hall building.  Whether you’re enjoying lunch or dinner, start with fresh-shucked oysters, steamers, tuna sashimi, lobster or shrimp cocktail, or cherrystones and littlenecks from their raw bar.   Alternatively, try the award-winning lobster bisque or cherry pepper calamari.  For main courses, Turner’s has a variety of fish dishes, fried seafood, pastas, and even a sandwich board.  They also feature New England lobsters (both regular and lazy-man’s, as I call it), a made-to-order New England bouillabaisse, and many gluten-free options.  If you’d like to have a lovely, sit-down, New England style dinner, you can’t beat Turner’s Seafood.

7. Ye Olde Pepper Companie

No, I’m not sending you to store that sells peppers or spices.  Ye Olde Pepper Companie is actually the oldest candy company in the United States (since 1806).  If that’s not enough of a reason to visit, their chocolates, fudge, salt water taffy, caramel corn, and other old fashioned candies are hand-made using original recipes that have been passed down through the generations.  I dare you to walk into the store, take in the intoxicating aroma of chocolate and sweets, and leave without buying anything!  If you plan on visiting the House of Seven Gables, Ye Olde Pepper Companie is located right across the street.  How convenient!

Locations

Click on a name to be taken to a driving or walking map.

Caramel is located at 281 Essex St. in Salem, MA.

The Clam Shack is located at 200 Fort Ave., Salem Willows Park, in Salem, MA.

Boston Burger Company is located at 133 Washington St. in Salem.

Flatbread Company is located at 311 Derby St. in Salem.

Passage to India is located at 157 Washington St. in Salem.

Turner’s Seafood is located at 43 Church St. in Salem.

Ye Old Pepper Companie is located at 122 Derby St. in Salem.